When is the best time to disclose HIV

74
COMMENT

Disseminate means telling someone that you are living with HIV. Sharing your HIV status can help you cope with the stress of living with HIV. However, decide who and how to say it can be complicated and difficult.

Consider where you want the disclosure to take place. It could be at home, in a friend's house, or in a health care facility so that support is readily available.

Although you may receive love and support from some of the people you reveal it to, others may not accept it. Try to find someone who can support you through this difficult process. If you have not yet told any family member or close friend, click here

Disclosing your HIV status will also have an effect on the people you tell you about. People will react differently to the news. Your friends and family can embrace you and accept your diagnosis immediately. Others may react negatively or need some time to process what they have been told. They may be afraid - for you or for themselves - and may need some information, as well as time, to adapt.

Some people, especially sexual partners who may be afraid of being infected, react with anger. If you feel unsafe or threatened; it is important that you stay safe and stay safe.

You do not have to tell everyone that you live with HIV. However, it is important that you inform your current and former sexual partners as well as the people with whom you have shared drug injection equipment. This way they can get the necessary tests and seek medical attention, if necessary.

In most cases, sharing your HIV status is a personal decision. However, in the case of sexual intercourse, this may be a legal requirement. It is best to reveal your status before having sex with anyone.

Not disclosing your HIV status in a sexual relationship can lead to criminal charges regardless of whether your partner contracts HIV or not. In most states in the USA In the US, it is mandatory to disclose your HIV status before consciously exposing, or transmitting HIV, to another person. The penalties vary in each state. In many states, you may be guilty of felony if you do not inform a sexual partner that you live with HIV before having intimate contact.

If you are in a formal relationship, telling your partner is one of the first things that probably come to mind. Many turn to their partners to receive comfort and support. However, many people worry about losing the love of their partner at the time of revealing the news. It is normal to feel nervous, embarrassed, or even afraid of your partner's reaction.

Since it is most likely that you and your partner have sex, you need to let them know that you have been exposed to HIV and that a test should be done. In addition, practicing safe sex is now more important than ever.

Revealing their serological status can put the best of relationships to the test. It is important that you think about when and how to reveal the news. However, keeping the information to yourself for a long time is probably not a good idea. If you find it difficult to decide when and how to tell your partner, it may be helpful to get professional advice.

If HIV or medications are interfering with your ability to work, it may be a good idea to reveal your situation privately to your boss. You can request an adjustment in your schedule or workload so that you can continue to perform such work. While the law considers that a person living with HIV is a person with a disability, the employer is obligated to reasonably meet their needs if you have difficulty performing the essential tasks of the job.

Women often choose to reveal their situation to close friends and family members they trust. For many people, telling them to the people closest to them gives them emotional and practical support.

Some people decide to make it more public and use their stories to advocate for others in front of the government or in the media. Others may disclose it for educational purposes to their neighbors, community, religious groups, schools, other people living with HIV, or health providers. Many women find a sense of purpose and growing self-esteem by telling their story.

Children can react to HIV news in the family in many different ways. Older children may be upset because they have kept something secret. Younger children will only want to return to their toys. Partial truths can be useful when children are told. You can decide to tell them only what they consider appropriate for their age.

However, telling other people that you live with HIV can also have disadvantages. It is important to think carefully about whom to say it to. Remember that once you have spread the news, it is no longer possible to go back. Organizations and health clinics can offer resources to guide you through the disclosure process.

In close connection, studies show that living with a secret, such as HIV, can be more harmful than the rejection that could result from making it known. Many women who have kept a secret for a long time feel a sense of relief after telling at least one other person.